UNDERSTANDING THE JAPANESE SWORD

Coming up later this year… Its based on the questions I receive on a daily basis translating sword stuff for now 12 years and doing it professionally and full time for almost 10 years. Aim is to give a basic guideline on the Japanese sword, not much technical talk, not going into great detail about kantei, schools, workmanships, and styles, just to provide an orientation guide for those brand new into the subject, to provide a solid basic knowledge from where to proceed (or not). Thus it will be an inexpensive paper-back, nothing fancy, just tips and stuff from my own experience.
.
How was the Japanese sword made and why was/is it made that way? What different sword forms do exist, how were they classified, and how do we classify them today? What are all these sword forms like tachi, uchigatana, sashizoe, koshigatana, chiisagatana, tantô, naginata, nagamaki, etc. and why did they emerge? Why are there “art swords,” or rather, what makes a sword an “art sword”? How were swords evaluated and appraised in the past and how is it done today? How and why were all these lists of swordsmiths (meikan) compiled? How do all the past and present swordsmith rankings work and why is there such a thing? How are swords certified/appraised today, i.e. what to do when you want to get papers for your sword and/or have your sword restored. How to recognize fake swords and practical tips for the online sword world. How to study swords hands on and how to get involved in clubs and associations? Tips for collecting or for starting a collection…
.
utjs_small
Advertisements

5 thoughts on “UNDERSTANDING THE JAPANESE SWORD

  1. Very cool! Awesome news! Need early purchases? Another quick question: Did Nidai Kanemoto ever actually sign swords with Magoroku? Or was this an honorific designated by others? Woo-hoo!

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    • Thx Bobby! No early purchases needed but I might start a patreon page some time down the road. As for Nidai Kanemoto, yes, he did sign with Magoroku, that is in the form (まこ六兼元), using hiragana for “Mago”.

  2. It sounds like a good idea, since understanding the nihonto is very difficult and for most is of us is a goal we will not accomplish.
    I have only been collecting for about 6 years and I still feel overwhelmed.
    I will be happy to read a copy.
    Have a pleasant day
    Respectfully
    Jack

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s